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National Recording Registry - Rhythm Nation 1814


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  • Recording Artist: Janet Jackson
    Title: (Janet Jackson's) Rhythm Nation 1814
    Released: September 18, 1989
    Record Label: A&M Records (presently: Interscope Records)



    September 14, 1814: the day Francis Scott Key penned the national anthem. The same week 175 years later, a new anthem was released, Rhythm Nation 1814. After establishing herself as one of the pop music's newest forces with 1986's Control, Janet Jackson set out to deal with a troubled world in a positive way. A 23 year-old woman diminutive in stature, but a voice the size of Texas captured the hearts and minds of Americans with the release of 1989's Rhythm Nation 1814. Jackson grabbed national attention by combining social issues with a contemporary music sound that was strong both musically and lyrically. Her message is one that transcends age, race, ethnicity, religion, and the countless social barriers that divide the America. She is a visionary for mankind willing to look past all human differences and inequalities to unite in a fight against injustice. "Nation" takes listeners on a journey through the harsh realities of poverty, homelessness, violence, drugs, and hunger, while envisioning a unified nation rid of color lines, emphasizing the importance education, and ensuring a brighter future for our children.


    Rhythm Nation 1814 opens with Jackson's political statement "Rhythm Nation", a song calling for unity and an end to racism. She is relentless in her pursuit as she belts, "It's time to give a damn let's work together!" The journey continues with the disturbing "State of the World" (which chronicles teenage pregnancy and homelessness), "The Knowledge" (a song placing value on education and solely responsible for encouraging high school dropouts Kia and Keisha Porter to finish school, graduating in 1990 -- coincidentally, 1814 being the year the first women's college was founded), and "Livin' In A World (They Didn't Make)", which decries the reality of children being exposed to violence. Contrastingly, Jackson balances the social commentary of the album by celebrating the nation's growth with progressive tracks including "Love Will Never Do (Without You)", which explores the advantages of racial harmony. "Alright" acknowledges the importance of interpersonal relationships, while "Escapade" depicts a stress-free lifestyle, and "Black Cat" cautions youth against using drugs. Short but poignant, the interludes, ranging from five to thirty seconds in length, operate as segues between songs, tying them together and reinforcing the message of the album. Jackson believes the first step to "a better way of life" is through unity. Once achieved, America can thrive as a nation.


    Jackson's formula of combining dance music with a positive message, a trend still present in pop music, was an unprecedented success - more than 14 million copies sold, Billboard chart records that bested those set by Michael Jackson and Bruce Springsteen, a record setting number of awards, and a level of success in which critics believed Jackson's success was rivaling that of older brother Michael's. Aside from the album's stratospheric success, Rhythm Nation 1814 is a call to action, a political statement, and a moment in music. In a country where cries for help have often fallen upon deaf ears, and the need for help has only been seen by the blind eye, Rhythm Nation 1814 has blossomed as a voice for the everyman in a country where cries can usually only be heard from the top. By confronting America's issues, Jackson showed the world that "In complete darkness, we are all the same". The album's social commentary challenged disenfranchised people from all over the world to come together and stand up against injustice. The cultural and historical significance of Rhythm Nation 1814, an album so powerful it brought former President George H. W. Bush to one of Jackson's live shows, is immeasurable. Janet Jackson's "nation" had a rhythm that moved a nation, and inspired change through song and dance. The album continues to reflect the social and political climate of American life as the issues presented in Jackson's landmark work continue to make headlines today. Rhythm Nation 1814 remains a moment in history and a thread in the social fabric of America as one of your own inductees, Stevie Wonder, has named this album as the greatest album in pop history.

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No I haven't sent it. What errors do you see?

And Google is in here yet again. :sigh:

Not sure if it should be "the pop music's newest forces". The "the" isn't really needed, is it?

I'm a comma junkie, so I tend to place commas everywhere. Don't worry about it. :asham:

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It's no biggie. :)

Keep us posted on any responses from them. :excited:

And again, great job. :clapping: :clapping: :clapping: :clapping:

mtv_ICON_Janet_Jackson_March_10_2001_(10).jpg

I couldn't have done it without everyone's help. -_-

They told me nominations are announced in the spring, so that's when we'll hear something. If Janet gets nominated, I am going to GAAAAAG! :lmao:

And I was thinking about doing another one since they said there's no real deadline. :unsure:

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mtv_ICON_Janet_Jackson_March_10_2001_(10).jpg

I couldn't have done it without everyone's help. -_-

They told me nominations are announced in the spring, so that's when we'll hear something. If Janet gets nominated, I am going to GAAAAAG! :lmao:

And I was thinking about doing another one since they said there's no real deadline. :unsure:

:lol:

Is there a ceremony for this thing? If there is and RN1814 is added, Janet better attend and you better be invited. :excited:

Just make sure to get some extra tickets for us. :filenails:

Maybe I should work on a submission for Barbra. :excited:

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:lol:

Is there a ceremony for this thing? If there is and RN1814 is added, Janet better attend and you better be invited. :excited:

Just make sure to get some extra tickets for us. :filenails:

Maybe I should work on a submission for Barbra. :excited:

I'm not sure, but if there is one I'll definitely go since the Library of Congress is literally down the street from campus. If not, I'll just invite myself. :coffee:

"Funny Girls", "The Way We Were", and "People" would probably be the best songs to submit for Babs imo

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  • 2 months later...

I'm not sure, but if there is one I'll definitely go since the Library of Congress is literally down the street from campus. If not, I'll just invite myself. :coffee:

"Funny Girls", "The Way We Were", and "People" would probably be the best songs to submit for Babs imo

You better! LOL

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  • 3 months later...

National Recording Registry adds new offerings

•Edison Talking Doll cylinder (1888). The recording of Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star— sung by one of Thomas Edison's employees for use in a talking doll — is the earliest-known commercial sound recording in existence.

•Come Down Ma Evenin' Star, Lillian Russell (1912). The sole surviving recording of Russell, a musical stage star in the late 19th and early 20th century.

•Ten Cents a Dance, Ruth Etting (1930). Etting, one of the first great singers of the microphone era, introduced the song in the musical Simple Simon.

•Voices From the Days of Slavery (1932-1941). The only known audio recordings of former slaves include 24 interviews conducted in nine states.

•I Want to Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart, Patsy Montana (1935). One of the first hits by a female country-and-western singer.

•Fascinating Rhythm, Sol Hoopii and his Novelty Five (1938). The master of the Hawaiian steel guitar goes electric and improvises on a Gershwin standard.

•Artistry in Rhythm, Stan Kenton & and his Orchestra (1943). The aggressive sound and layered instrumentation is typical of Kenton's work.

•Debut with the New York Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein (Nov. 14, 1943). Bernstein, 25, then a little-known assistant conductor, was a last-minute sub.

•International Sweethearts of Rhythm: Hottest Women's Band of the 1940s (1944-1946). A rare commercial recording by the interracial female jazz band formed at a Mississippi boarding school for African-American children.

•The Indians for Indians Hour (March 25, 1947). The weekly radio show featuring guests and music from 18 Native American tribes aired on WNAD in Norman, Okla.

•Hula Medley, Gabby Pahinui (1947). One of the first modern recordings of slack-key guitar, a style originating in Hawaii.

•I Can Hear It Now, Fred W. Friendly and Edward R. Murrow (1948). A collection of speech excerpts and news reports, featuring everyone from Will Rogers to Adolf Hitler and narration by CBS Radio's Murrow.

•Let's Go Out to the Programs, The Dixie Hummingbirds (1953). A re-creation of a multi-artist gospel show featuring imitations of the Soul Stirrers, the Blind Boys of Mississippi, the Pilgrim Travelers and the Bells of Joy.

•Also Sprach Zarathustra, Fritz Reiner and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (1954, 1958). A high-fidelity recording of the ensemble that Igor Stravinsky hailed as "the most precise and flexible orchestra in the world."

•Bo Diddley and I'm a Man, Bo Diddley (1955). Diddley's first single, a double-sided hit.

•Green Onions, Booker T. & the M.G.'s (1962). The instrumental became the title cut of the first LP by the racially integrated Stax Records house band.

•Forever Changes, Love (1967). The band's landmark fusion of psychedelic, mainstream and classical styles.

•The Continental Harmony: Music of William Billings, Gregg Smith Singers (1969). The recording that re-introduced the composer to the world after a century of obscurity.

•A Charlie Brown Christmas, Vince Guaraldi Trio (1970). The soundtrack to the animated Peanuts TV special brought jazz to millions of listeners.

•Coat of Many Colors, Dolly Parton (1971). The autobiographical song, about an impoverished childhood made rich by love, established Parton as a credible songwriter.

•Mothership Connection, Parliament (1975). "Ain't nothin' but a party, y'all," George Clinton declared on the title track of the enormously influential funk album.

•Barton Hall concert by the Grateful Dead (May 8, 1977). The revered Cornell University show is a favorite of Deadhead tape traders.

•I Feel Love, Donna Summer (1977). The entirely electronic track played off Summer's ethereal vocal and took the dance clubs by storm.

•Rapper's Delight, Sugarhill Gang (1979). The trio's rhythmic rhyming inspired countless MCs and rap artists.

•Purple Rain, Prince and the Revolution (1984). The provocative and controversial movie that launched Prince into superstardom. Its most explicit lyrics led to the founding of the Parents Music Resource Center.

http://detroit.metromix.com/music/article/national-recording-registry-adds/3069083/content

----

:thumbup: @ Dolly's Coat of Many Colors being added.

Maybe next year for RN!

Judy, can you just re-submit what you sent before? :unsure:

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  • 8 years later...

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